potential what we do

What We Do

The Homeless Prenatal Program (HPP) is an award-winning San Francisco Family Resource Center. For 25 years, HPP has provided poor and homeless families the ability to end childhood poverty. Built on a foundation of supportive, nonjudgmental case management, we empower families, particularly mothers motivated by pregnancy and parenthood, to recognize their strengths and trust in their own capacity to transform their lives.

As the first agency in San Francisco to hire former clients as program and case managers, the agency’s growth and evolution have been guided by those we serve. Because case managers share some of the same life experiences as the women they help, they are able to create a relationship of trust and credibility with clients. They partner with clients to design a plan for health and self-sufficiency; they serve as role models for clients who want to turn their lives around, and they have been instrumental in expanding our services when they see the need in their clients. Today, more than half of HPP’s program staff are former clients, or from the community we serve.

HPP has three major goals:

  1. Healthy Babies: ensure that parents give birth to healthy babies and successfully bond with their infants

  2. Safe, Nurturing Families Where Children Thrive: ensure that parents are knowledgeable, motivated and empowered to support their children’s success and healthy development

  3. Economically Stable Families: ensure that families have access to information and resources that move them towards permanent, stable housing and economic self-sufficiency.

Over the past 25 years, HPP evolved from focusing solely on prenatal care for mothers into a Family Resource Center with a broader, more holistic mission – breaking the cycle of childhood poverty. More than 4,000 families access HPP’s services each year, with nearly 200 families coming to HPP for the first time every month. Today, HPP offers services focused on housing, prenatal and parenting support, child development, family finances and stability, access to technology, domestic violence and substance abuse, family unification, and emergency support of basic needs.